WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

The World Conservation Congress is a high priority for WCS and provides an important opportunity for us to promote the conservation and protection of wildlife and wild places. At the Congress, WCS will work to ensure there is significant attention on the conservation of wildlife and wild places, including: the conservation of threatened and endangered species; the establishment, management, and conservation of protected areas; the need to take strong action to stop wildlife trafficking, including efforts to end the ivory trade; and the need to protect the world’s great intact forests and other intact ecosystems.

WCS is playing a major role in organizing content for the Forum including keynote talks, workshops, and panel discussions, as well as promoting the adoption of key motions for the Members’ Assembly. WCS will be employing digital and social media to broadly share the messages from the Congress.

WCS will also focus on key motions at the Congress, including those addressing the need for conservation action for: elephants (and the closure of domestic ivory markets); pangolins; helmeted hornbills; eels; sharks and rays; whales and dolphins; tigers; giraffes; and intact forests.

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Latest News


To mark World Turtle Day, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) celebrates the conservation of the Critically Endangered Cantor’s giant softshell turtles in Cambodia.


A WCS special report shows how degradation of ecological systems has significantly increased the overall risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks and has other complex effects on human health.


Conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) in Myanmar have announced that this year for the first time, an isolated female Burmese roofed turtle living far upstream on the Chindwin River who has never been known to produce fertile eggs, deposited...


A giant South American river turtle (Podocnemis expansa) equipped with a tiny acoustic transmitter lumbers back to its watery home in the Meta River in eastern Colombia. 


A new study investigating the links between coastal communities and coral reefs in Kenya and Madagascar has found that access to education and markets can help mitigate acute vulnerabilities for communities struggling with poverty and reliant on ecosystems degraded by overfishing.

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