WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

The World Conservation Congress is a high priority for WCS and provides an important opportunity for us to promote the conservation and protection of wildlife and wild places. At the Congress, WCS will work to ensure there is significant attention on the conservation of wildlife and wild places, including: the conservation of threatened and endangered species; the establishment, management, and conservation of protected areas; the need to take strong action to stop wildlife trafficking, including efforts to end the ivory trade; and the need to protect the world’s great intact forests and other intact ecosystems.

WCS is playing a major role in organizing content for the Forum including keynote talks, workshops, and panel discussions, as well as promoting the adoption of key motions for the Members’ Assembly. WCS will be employing digital and social media to broadly share the messages from the Congress.

WCS will also focus on key motions at the Congress, including those addressing the need for conservation action for: elephants (and the closure of domestic ivory markets); pangolins; helmeted hornbills; eels; sharks and rays; whales and dolphins; tigers; giraffes; and intact forests.


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