WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

WCS at the IUCN World Conservation Congress

The World Conservation Congress is a high priority for WCS and provides an important opportunity for us to promote the conservation and protection of wildlife and wild places. At the Congress, WCS will work to ensure there is significant attention on the conservation of wildlife and wild places, including: the conservation of threatened and endangered species; the establishment, management, and conservation of protected areas; the need to take strong action to stop wildlife trafficking, including efforts to end the ivory trade; and the need to protect the world’s great intact forests and other intact ecosystems.

WCS is playing a major role in organizing content for the Forum including keynote talks, workshops, and panel discussions, as well as promoting the adoption of key motions for the Members’ Assembly. WCS will be employing digital and social media to broadly share the messages from the Congress.

WCS will also focus on key motions at the Congress, including those addressing the need for conservation action for: elephants (and the closure of domestic ivory markets); pangolins; helmeted hornbills; eels; sharks and rays; whales and dolphins; tigers; giraffes; and intact forests.

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Latest News


WCS EU applauds the competent Chamber Committee for supporting the Law proposal 54K3202001, which once adopted will ban domestic sales, export and import of elephant ivory within, from, and to Belgium.


Conservationists from WCS’s Tanzania Program say translocated zebras are flourishing in Kitulo National Park.


The John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act was signed into law today. 


A new study maps nature’s strongholds where the world’s threatened species can take refuge from the ravages of unregulated hunting, land clearing, and other industrial activities.


Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups examining the ecological status of coral reefs across the Indian and Pacific oceans have uncovered an unsettling fact: even the best coral reef marine parks contain less than half of the fish biomass found in the most remote...

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